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I have lost very few tools in bone yards or really anywhere else. The quickest way to lose tools is to loan them to someone. Really if you loan them to anyone, your brother, etc. it rarely matters you will usually have to go ask for them back. I never had a problem with a guy breaking a tool I loaned him either, I have a problem with having to go and get my tools back or the guys that lose them.

Years ago I was attempting to pull a piece of front fender trim from an old C-10 Chevy in junk yard. I had my hand stuffed under the fender with a 1/4 ratchet, extension and socket. Then a couple of wasps come whizzing out from under there closely followed by my hand and everything but the socket I was using to remove the trim. Place was way out in the country so forget going and buying hornet spray. The socket was left behind.

It took me 5 years or more to make it back to that yard, this time I needed the whole fender that trim piece was attached to so I got my socket back that day, a bit rusty but I got it back. Only lost a few sockets through the years, most losses I even remember the brand and socket and where I lost it.
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Heavy Shop Equipment / Re: WTF blasphemy
« Last post by TWX on Today at 12:01:08 PM »
LOL the chuck probably spins the direction of the arrow (bassackwards)

Greyson
If one has to do a lot of broken fastener extraction that could actually be an advantage...
Nah, just get a reversible motor.

Depends on how it's tensioned.  If there's an idler pulley then it wouldn't function right in reverse.  Could also be a problem with the chuck spinning off of the spindle.
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Heavy Shop Equipment / Re: WTF blasphemy
« Last post by kwoswalt99 on Today at 11:22:08 AM »
LOL the chuck probably spins the direction of the arrow (bassackwards)

Greyson
If one has to do a lot of broken fastener extraction that could actually be an advantage...
Nah, just get a reversible motor.
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Heavy Shop Equipment / Re: WTF blasphemy
« Last post by TWX on Today at 10:44:15 AM »
LOL the chuck probably spins the direction of the arrow (bassackwards)

Greyson
If one has to do a lot of broken fastener extraction that could actually be an advantage...
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I had a 12" prybar take a ride on one of semi's. Somewhere between home and Hall's Tn someone got a free craftsman red handle. I learned then an organized tool box plays 2 rolls. Finding tools and knowing you haven't leave any behind.

This is why despite it being space-inefficient I still use the blow-molded plastic case that my portable craftsman kit came with for the junkyarding and field work tools.  I've had to add a bunch of extras like pliers and screwdrivers, but I've never lost a socket, extension, wrench, or ratchet and I don't think that I've lost any of what I've added to it either.
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...Power fist...


I'm sorry, but every time I see this brand I think of this scene from the movie Top Secret!:
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General Discussion Board / Re: What's really an "American" car?
« Last post by TWX on Today at 10:25:59 AM »
That ship sailed a very long time ago.

My '78 Chrysler was assembled in Windsor, Ontario Canada, using an engine from Detroit and a transmission from Kokomo, Indiana.

At this point I'm not even sure what metric to use for determining country.  Automakers are international conglomerates and publicly traded, so despite where their headquarters may be, ownership and profits from ownership are literally everywhere, design happens everywhere, and both component manufacturing and final assembly happen all over the place.
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General Discussion Board / What's really an "American" car?
« Last post by goodfellow on Today at 10:06:57 AM »
We have a 2005 Toyota Highlander and a 2012 Chevy Traverse and I've bought a lot of dealer parts for both of them in the last few years. One thing that has stood out and become crystal clear is even though Chevy is an "American" car company, all the damn parts I bought for it were either made in China or Mexico. On the other hand, almost every part I bought for the Toyota was mostly made in the US and only a handful were made in Japan.

That begs the question -- which car is truly the American car? My neighbor just bought an Equinox and come to find out that the vehicle is assembled in both Mexico and Canada, not the US (At least our Traverse was assembled in Lansing). Most all the GM parts are now China and Mexico. Toyota vehicles like the Camry and Tundra are assembled in the US and most of their parts are contracted directly from US suppliers.

Which begs the question -- what's an American car? GM uses some real cheap Chinese parts -- especially the electrical components.

Forbes did a study on the most "American" made car (i.e. car that has the most US sourced components) - and the Camry led the pack. Tesla is almost 100% US made and sourced, but I'm not ready to step up to all electric -- yet. 

https://www.forbes.com/pictures/mkk45lmli/1-toyota-camry/#75bf266a4063

I'm shopping for a new car and giving the Toyotas a good look. I love my old Highlander, but want a sedan this time around.
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That is mild compared to the rust in my Mazda bed, you are going some really good work. 

John, I doubt you could even find a good used bed for these old war horses anymore. You'd probably have to make one, and that would be a serious undertaking. In my case I welded the patches a lot colder than normal to keep penetration lower and blowing through the old corroded metal. It looks like crap, but the patches hold and at this point it's the only way for this kind of "Scheib" job.
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