Author Topic: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71  (Read 190 times)

Offline jabberwoki

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There is a very fine line between a hobby and a mental illness.

Does the need justify the want ? Or does the want suffice?

Offline rvannatta

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Re: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2017, 01:56:59 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es5iyQVUX4o


like any 2 cycle it makes a bunch of smoke and noise (Detroit diesel trade marks)   but I'm not sure what they did for a radiator....it wasn't in evidence and it wouldn't be nice
to run that thing without some cooling water.     Although for brief runs a water tank so some where would work.

While these engines were a lot of iron in their day by todays standards for truck engines that model excels only in weight and size.   it is 2  DD 6-71's  cast into a v12.    As such it's a jump ahead
of the older version  which was 2 6-71 engine blocks bolted side by side (actually about 2 inches apart that were joined together in a gear box behind the flywheel.   To balance things one turned left
and the other turned right...   but either way you get around  425 hp.     As with all  Detroit diesel engines this model had a roots blower to feed air into the cylinders.... -- in the case of the V models-- it was located
in the V  between the cylinder heads.    ---     The  V-8 version was very popular at a truck engine  (with 318 hp)  for a long time in the 1970's and 1980's  (until emissions rules exterminated them)

As a last harrah  DD figured out how to increase the displacement to 93 inches per cylinder and produced the  8-v92  in some numbers.      The  early 8-v92's had a bad realibility reputation but GM
identified the problems  and as a last harrah before shutting down produced the  "Silver 93"   which  quickly got a high reliablity rating.      To further squeeze more performance out of them that added
a Turbo Charger, and got around 450 hp out of the  8-v92-TA  making it more powerful than the 12-V71   and
small enough to actually fit in a truck.

This is the engines found in our OSHKOSH trucks..



Offline rvannatta

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Re: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2017, 02:09:22 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es5iyQVUX4o

like any 2 cycle it makes a bunch of smoke and noise (Detroit diesel trade marks)   but I'm not sure what they did for a radiator....it wasn't in evidence and it wouldn't be nice
to run that thing without some cooling water.     Although for brief runs a water tank so some where would work.

While these engines were a lot of iron in their day by todays standards for truck engines that model excels only in weight and size.   it is 2  DD 6-71's  cast into a v12.    As such it's a jump ahead
of the older version  which was 2 6-71 engine blocks bolted side by side (actually about 2 inches apart that were joined together in a gear box behind the flywheel.   To balance things one turned left
and the other turned right...   but either way you get around  425 hp.     As with all  Detroit diesel engines this model had a roots blower to feed air into the cylinders.... -- in the case of the V models-- it was located
in the V  between the cylinder heads.    ---     The  V-8 version was very popular at a truck engine  (with 318 hp)  for a long time in the 1970's and 1980's  (until emissions rules exterminated them)

As a last harrah  DD figured out how to increase the displacement to 93 inches per cylinder and produced the  8-v92  in some numbers.      The  early 8-v92's had a bad realibility reputation but GM
identified the problems  and as a last harrah before shutting down produced the  "Silver 93"   which  quickly got a high reliablity rating.      To further squeeze more performance out of them that added
a Turbo Charger, and got around 450 hp out of the  8-v92-TA  making it more powerful than the 12-V71   and
small enough to actually fit in a truck.

This is the engines found in our OSHKOSH trucks..


just in case someone wants to go hill climbing    I have a reccommended place.....    you can start  in the forground of this photo in the cow pasture    but it becomes progressively more difficult....

Offline john k

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Re: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2017, 08:59:23 AM »
Guy that has one of those Stude diesels always has to explain they really did build them.  Again the guy with the big toys proves it!   Unless I am mistaken that is a 1960s Army Tank Retriever, 6x6, got some big winches behind the cab, sure it doesn't work too hard hauling that Cat, its heavy but not quite  the 52 tons the tank weighed.  Is that view of Mt. St. Helens?   visible from the house I wonder?

Offline rvannatta

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Re: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2017, 10:12:23 AM »
Guy that has one of those Stude diesels always has to explain they really did build them.  Again the guy with the big toys proves it!   Unless I am mistaken that is a 1960s Army Tank Retriever, 6x6, got some big winches behind the cab, sure it doesn't work too hard hauling that Cat, its heavy but not quite  the 52 tons the tank weighed.  Is that view of Mt. St. Helens?   visible from the house I wonder?

As for Mt. st. helens----   there are a couple places on the ranch from which it can be seen but it's quite a ways off as we are in Oregon and  it's in Washington  probably 50 miles away.    the flat land in the foreground is
locallyl known as  "Cowlitz Prairie"  ---   a popular area for  livestock feeding operations  lying SE of  Chehalis,   WA.   --- (a town along I-5  about half way to Oregon from Seattle.

As for the tank retreiver--- that indeed    two large hydraulic winches behind the cab.   the army used a ramp trailer,   and it was suppose to be able to drag a disabled tank up on the trailer. 

Offline fatfillup

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Re: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2017, 10:15:29 AM »
that Studi has a Mad Max vibe
That scalloped box end is one of the few BB features that doesn't make Elroy puke

Offline rvannatta

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Re: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2017, 01:08:21 AM »
that Studi has a Mad Max vibe

I've always had a special place for stude's.    when I  go old enough for a car of my own--it ended up being
my Grandmonthers   1951 Studebaker Champion.   ---   it was a plain jane 2 door couple  with no extras except
and underseat heater.

the only thing that makes me think that the underseat heater may have been an option    was that, if you turned
on  the underseat heater,   the defroster  (it was separate and under the dash),  the headlights,  and the wipers,
the combined load was more than the 6 volt generator could put out----  and the amp meter would start showing
a negative number.     since I was in college at the time and live in western Oregon where dark rainy nights were the norm
I had to choose which thing to go without or risk running the battery down as I drove.     sometimes  I  switched back
and forth  between the defroster and the heater...    or if it wasn't raining too hard,  I'd just turn the wipers on for
a swipe now and then...

and then there were the brakes----   didn't need power assist.   the shoes were a couple of inches wide and the drum
about 8 inches in diamater.     They were good for one hard stop  from around 70 mph,   but forget about a second one...
you quickly what  'brake fade' was.     ifyou tried a second70 mph stop,   you could push on the brake pedal as hard
as you wanted and not much happened...        If you have never experience brake fade---I can assure you,  it's very unsettling
to step on the brakes--- and   have nothing happen--- and I don'tmean the pedal going to the floor.---   I mean it going down
part way just like it should---   only you can push until the pedal bends  and it doesn't slow down...

Defensive driving was---if you had to use the brakes hard once  --- you slowed down for a while and were very careful
no to do any thing that might require hard braking for a while so the brakes could cool down.

It's a lesson that served me well in later years as I have driven truck---------   don't press your luck on long down grades   unless
you are interested in taking out the guard rail at the square corner that is at the bottom of every long steep hill.

This is why before the adventof the Jake Brake,  trucks in  mountainous areas were equipped with 'water on the brakes'....    Makes
a big cloud of water vapor,   and cracks lots of brake drums,  but over all  gets you stopped   before the square corner at the
bottom of the hill  (every hill has one)

When it comes to hills   my nomination  for uglies   is the Lewiston grade....     6 miles down--- the first 3 miles
are at 6%  --- the us highway standard maximum grade  for a state highway, and the second 3 miles is at 7%.


and this is what the Idaho dept of transportation says about it::
US 95: Lewiston Hill
4 miles north of the Lewiston area
Steep Grade for 6 miles. Max grade is 7%.
Runaway truck ramps available for southbound traffic.
No fee for emergency use of runaway truck ramps.

--------------------------------------
and then there is a major highway intersection  at the bottom  with a traffic light.     the Lewiston grade is on US 95 just
north of  Lewiston   ----    Here US 95 meanders through wheat fields of the Palouse country and suddenly drops over edge of
the Snake River Canyon,  and drops to river level   which is low enough that barge traffic can make it from Lewiston  down the
Snake and Columbia Rivers  where their loads can be tranferred to ocean going shipping.

Fortunately,   I'm in western Oregon so I don't have to truck down the Lewiston grade,  but I do go down a 3 miles 7% on US 30
in Western Oregon with nearly every load of logs I sell.     The exit ramp at the bottom  used by most truck traffic to access the log markets in Washington state has a 120 degree turn,   and the DOT   gets to refurbish the guard rail on the corner at least annually
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 01:41:40 AM by rvannatta »

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Re: Cool o, Studi truck with a 12v71
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2017, 01:08:21 AM »

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