Author Topic: Matching Compressors to Tools  (Read 3245 times)

Offline DeadNutz

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Re: Matching Compressors to Tools
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2016, 11:12:54 AM »
All great comments and suggestions by everybody. Just let me add that one thing I check on a used compressor is the air filter. If it is dirty and clogged that is not good for the machine. It will affect the purchase price at minimum and the purchase at most.

Offline gtermini

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Re: Matching Compressors to Tools
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2016, 01:19:07 PM »
Just hold out and watch for a deal on a compressor. There 25 beat to shit ones for every decent unit. I bought a late 80s 60 gal, 2 stage, 5HP, 18 cfm Italian made compressor for $650 that had been the back-up in a small restoration shop then sold at auction to a guy who never hooked it up. Looked like new and had all the paperwork and yearly service records by a local compressor supplier. It was a no-brainer purchase for me, but I had looked at maybe 10 others over a year that were always worse than the picture when you showed in person. If you can get a nice USA build oldie for next to nothing, it may be worth rebuilding if the tank's any good. If it's more than a song, you'll probably end up in it more than you could have found something else for.

Air tools are addictive. You can't beat the power to weight, but you'll never have enough compressed air to be happy. I bought an Atlas Copco angle grinder that't 2HP, but smaller than a dewalt 4 1/2". The thing eats 65 cfm through a big fitting and takes two big shop compressors running non-stop to keep it fed.  The closest I've come to satisfied is hooking the 185 cfm diesel compressor into the system, but then you have to listen to it scream and it gets pulled away for another task just when you need it.

Another thing that makes a big difference on the tools,but doesn't help your compressor situation, is changing to European interchange high flow fittings. They are good for 75 cfm through a 1/4" coupler. Spendy and hard to find locally, but absolutely worth it in my opinion. I use CEJN 320 series for 1/4 and 3/8 and CEJN 550 for 1/2 and 3/4. Bigger than that and you go to the two ear twist together couplers.

Greyson

Offline lauver

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Re: Matching Compressors to Tools
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2016, 11:46:32 PM »
LifeLong,

As a point of reference, my 2HP 30GAL compressor rated at 5.5SCFM@90PSI can only last about one minute before the compressor starts running continuously when I'm using a die grinder. 

But, if I throttle my die grinder back to about 2,000 RPM (as apposed to 22,500 RPM) I can grind away for 5 minutes before I run out of air and the compressor starts running again.  So, by throttling back and stopping every few minutes to inspect my work I can nurse my undersized compressor along without it running continuously.  I've kind of developed a work rhythm that keeps both me and my compressor happy. 

Just saying...
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Offline brslk

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Re: Matching Compressors to Tools
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2016, 11:57:11 PM »
LifeLong,

As a point of reference, my 2HP 30GAL compressor rated at 5.5SCFM@90PSI can only last about one minute before the compressor starts running continuously when I'm using a die grinder. 

But, if I throttle my die grinder back to about 2,000 RPM (as apposed to 22,500 RPM) I can grind away for 5 minutes before I run out of air and the compressor starts running again.  So, by throttling back and stopping every few minutes to inspect my work I can nurse my undersized compressor along without it running continuously.  I've kind of developed a work rhythm that keeps both me and my compressor happy. 

Just saying...

Good advice Gary.
I used to do the same. It wasn't very often that I needed to go full out for extended periods of time when using air tools.
Even after I got a 5 HP 60 gallon compressor I still hardly find the need to go full out.
I'm just a guy in a garage with some tools...

Bruce.

The Garage Gazette

Re: Matching Compressors to Tools
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2016, 11:57:11 PM »

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