Author Topic: Drill Press Questions  (Read 2222 times)

Offline Bull

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Drill Press Questions
« on: September 04, 2011, 07:28:06 AM »
One thing I don't have in my garage is a drill press, and it seems to me that it is a pretty essential piece of equipment.  Would you fellows be willing to make some recommendations?

Should I be looking at floor or bench models?  My garage is not huge, but I don't want anything too rink-a-dink.

Can you recommend a good brand as far as vintage or used is concerned?  My budget is tight.  Sometimes, real tight.  Therefore, I reckon that I will need to get something older, maybe cosmetically imperfect.  But, I'd want something for which parts are available, or that are easy to repair/work with.

Thanks for any guidance.

Offline Fins/413

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2011, 07:52:01 AM »
I bought a CM in about 1980, floor model and have been pleased with it. I'd get a floor model if at all possible, more speeds are better and get yourself a good vise for it. With your luck you will find a real nice one in someones trash. I use mine for wheeling probably not the best idea as afar as the sideways pressure but I've not had any problems so far and I find I have much more clearance than a bench grinder.
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Online goodfellow

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2011, 08:19:35 AM »
One option Bull is to look for a used mill/drill if space is a concern. It has an XY table, is much sturdier, and has a very low speed option (which most drill presses don't have). All the affordable Asian drill presses just don't have a slow enough speed for drilling with larger bits. A conventional mill/drill does most everything better than a regular drill press, plus you can use it to do some light milling duties. A much more versatile tool ---

I've seen older mill/drills in the local CL price from $200-400 ---
« Last Edit: September 04, 2011, 08:22:39 AM by goodfellow »

Offline scottg

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2011, 08:48:34 AM »
Whatever you get Bull...
 You buy your machine equipment, by-the-pound.
If you can pick it up, you don't want it.  ;)
  yours Scott

Offline Busted_Knuckles

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2011, 09:13:19 AM »
I recently picked up a "Radial Floor Standing" Drill Press, Grizzly is the brand, is China, I think, but allot of bang for the buck at $80

http://www.grizzly.com/products/5-Speed-Floor-Radial-Drill-Press/G7946

Not suggesting you buy one, but you can get a drill press that will do allot more than just drill, everything on this is adjustable, everything on it rotates, the head rotates on 3 axis's, the table has several adjustments, allot of bang for the buck.
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Offline seagiant

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2011, 10:52:40 AM »
Hi,
     I admit I like the old power tools from the 1950"s. Cast iron all the way. I now own 2 bench drill presses from the early 50's. A Delta "homecraft" and a CM made by King-Seeley Corp. The CM drill press was used as bought for 20 years and then I changed out the bearings in the quill and motor and she's like new. The Delta "Homecraft" was just bought recently for $30 and is awaiting a rebuild this winter. I am now replacing the bearings in the original Delta motor that came with it but will rebuild the drill press later.

  I liked the idea of a mill drill if you plan on never getting a real mill. I also have a 1965 J head Bridgeport so only use the drill presses for punching holes. Any precision holes or reaming is done on the BP! I also prefer a heavy bench drill press instead of a stand up,but I am tall and the bench drill presses maybe fit me better!

  As far as parts for the old drill presses,if you buy the machine complete you will probably never need any parts the only thing that wears are the v-belts and bearings and thats only like every 30 years!
« Last Edit: September 04, 2011, 10:58:12 AM by seagiant »

Offline Frederick Flintstone

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2011, 10:59:40 AM »
Get a floor model at all costs. My first is an old atlas. Search CL. I have found many now that I have three. Whenever my wife wants to be a smart ass and a garage sale has tools she says no more drill presses, no more grinders. The cheapest good old drill press I found was $50 average price is $125.
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Offline Bull

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2011, 11:02:23 AM »
Thanks for the advice so far.  Never even heard of a mill/drill before.  I will have to Google that one.

That Grizzly does seem to have a lot of features.

In my fantasies, I would have some kind of smaller mill and know how to use it.  I'm sort of ape-ish though, and from what I can tell guys who know how to use mills and machine parts are really detail-oriented, smart, precise fellows.  Can an ape learn to use a mill?

Offline Busted_Knuckles

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2011, 11:09:58 AM »
Yes, when you rocket the part across the shop, you milling too much too fast, thats how I learned. Also the cutting heads are expensive enough, that you proceed with caution.
When birds fly in the right formation, they need only exert half the effort. Even in nature, teamwork results in collective laziness.

Offline strik9

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2011, 11:14:10 AM »
If I was capable of learning how to use my boss's Richmond gear drive drill press, you too can learn how  to use anything.

  Once you use a industrial quality machine its hard to go back to using a homeowner model.  You'll feel lost without the power and control the big machines offer.

Online goodfellow

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2011, 08:21:08 PM »
....... Never even heard of a mill/drill before.  I will have to Google that one.


Mill/Drills come in two basic flavors -- belt driven, and geared head





either machine will outperform a standard imported 15" or 17" drill press --

Offline williaty

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2011, 09:52:29 PM »
I will add the advice that, when shopping drill presses, take a bit of 3/8" or so bar stock to chuck up. Use it to get a rough indication of runout AND use it to press against the table with the typical amount of pressure you'd use on the downfeed. You'll be shocked at how many perfectly good drill presses are ruined by a table that flexes out enough to cause problems when you try to drill through steel rather than wood.

Offline scottg

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2011, 09:07:08 AM »
See what I meant?
Except for the Grizzly radial, everyone else keeps sending you to 800 pounds of metal. Or at least plenty heavy solid  vintage cast iron!
Mass is good in a machine tool.

  Also, anyone can mill stock first time!! 
The hyper precision guys do it within a ridiculous spec (and don't kid yourself its not the tool, its the mechanic)
 but general shop milling is a no brainer with any decent unit. Not to worry, even I can do it.  coffeex 
 yours Scott
 

Offline Packard V8

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2011, 03:18:37 PM »
There are basically three types of guys buying DPs:
1. Guys who occasionally want a hole in a workpiece.  Don't care who made it, don't care what it looks like, just git 'er done cheap.  They usually end up Chicom.

2. Guys who love quality machines and the look and feel of when America had some guts and glory.  They buy Craftsman, Delta, Rockwell, Powermatic, Boice-Crane, Atlas, Clausing, Avey, and the like, at least 25 years old, and 50 is better yet.

3. Guys who want a precise hole, to three decimal places.  They start out with a Chicom mill/drill, realize the limitations and usually end up with a real mill.

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Offline seagiant

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2011, 02:45:46 PM »
Hi Packard,
                 Can't help showing off my baby,a 1965 J-Head Bridgeport. I was in Sasabo,Japan on the Internet and put in another plea for info on a real mill on PM and a guy in Kentucky told me about a small machine shop near me in Fla. where the owner needed room for a new CNC unit and wanted to sell it for $2000! Only tooling was a nice vise. I built a platform for it so I would never have to stoop over using it and it's really a fun lathe to use. All I've ever done is clean it and oil it!

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Re: Drill Press Questions
« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2011, 02:45:46 PM »

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